Posted:December 14, 2005

You are what you eat … You know what you experience … You know what you know … But you don’t know what you don’t consider ….

I just walked outside my home and spent a glorious 30 min this evening viewing the snow, the sky, the vistas, the lights, all of it.

I’m about ready to head with my family to many days of skiing in Colorado.  We have done so before in many places and many states.  In every instance, I can remember the physical moments and the visual moments.  Some of those visual moments were quite striking:  looking over the back side of Big Mountain into Glacier, overlooking Lake Tahoe, looking north into the broad stretches of Canada.

But what truly blew my mind tonight was that the snowy ground and the vistas from my own backyard were as beautiful as what I have seen elsewhere.  Granted, I’ve got open space from my back porch here in Iowa City, but, face it, most anyone who does not live here would not believe there are "world class" views across these prairies.  My own backyard view combines pastoral scenes with some suburbia and with views no higher than one or two hundred of feet in topographic change.

But it is beautiful … and it is peaceful … and it is striking in its impact.

So, I think the following:  I’m about ready to head to a known wonderful place (in the Rockies) with known vistas and known aesthetics.  In that regard, I am a fortunate person and am willing to spend many dollars to do so.  But, then, I also think:  My own backyard is pretty cool.  Actually, more than cool:  Beautiful.

My family and I will have a great time and we will enjoy the skiing as we always do.  But the magic of our own vistas of snow this night, the lights at night and the dark rolling hills and naked branches are pretty cool here as well.

The short of it is this:  You don’t miss your water ’til your well runs dry, and you sometimes don’t even know what your true source of water is.

For me, tonight, it is my backyard.  I hope, if you care to look around and find the right viewpoint, that maybe it is the same for you ….

Drink deeply this Christmas …. 

Posted by AI3's author, Mike Bergman Posted on December 14, 2005 at 11:59 pm in Site-related | Comments (0)
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Posted:November 23, 2005

Yeah, I know it is kind of silly to celebrate a six-months anniversary (today!) for my blog site.  It  too uncomfortably bears resemblance to my daughter’s anniversaries regarding her boyfriends.  As for my wife and me, the periods have moved to decades ….

But I DID notice the recent calendar trigger.  It HAS been interesting watching growing use and popularity of my site; it HAS been instructive getting embedded in the daily/sorta regular posting mentality; it HAS been a change to drafting or writing based on an online medium; it HAS been true (I hate to admit) I watch how what I do on this site is being paid attention to or indexed or scored or ranked by other sites.

Probably enough said … I remain very intrigued with this medium and what it means from the global to the personal.

Thanks again for listening, occasionally watching, and sometimes commenting on what gets posted here.  Happy 6th month! 

Posted by AI3's author, Mike Bergman Posted on November 23, 2005 at 9:52 pm in Site-related | Comments (0)
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Posted:October 24, 2005

For some time now I have had a setting of ’5 days’ as the limit for the number of posts to display on my site.  My rationale, as in most things, was to limit the number of bytes any individual reader needed to wait for during  a site visit (and download).

However, that may be dial-up thinking.

I was playing around with my own site and viewed monthly archive options.  Lo and behold, with my 5-day limit, that also translated into that display as well.  So, I upped my limit to a full month (31 days) and repeated the step.

Sure, downloads were a little slower, but not truly noticeably so, and I am on an IDSL line (128 kb) anyway!  Anyone with anything approaching a modern connection should not have a problem upping post display limits.

Oh, well.  My advice to everyone (and I’m likely the last) is to up your blog display governors.

Posted by AI3's author, Mike Bergman Posted on October 24, 2005 at 4:25 pm in Blogs and Blogging, Site-related | Comments (0)
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Posted:October 22, 2005

I have been thankful for the many wonderful comments and reactions to my professional blogging guide.  My favorite is from Blizzard Internet Marketing:

When you come across such a generous addition to the web community you just have to share.  Last night, going through my feeds I came across the … Comprehensive Guide to a Professional Blog Site.  What a fantastic resource for the beginner professional blogger.  After spending just a few weeks with our own blog, researching and sharing online our quest to educate ourselves on the art, process, and best practices of blogging I came across this gem …. after spending just a few weeks on our own research I don't doubt how long it took to create this easy to read, easy to understand comprehensive guide.   

Michael's note taking and attention to detail as he went on his journey is impressive.  Just about every step of the way he details his tasks from choosing the program and why, to loading it on the server and configuring the system.  Within the guide are a number of resources for even more great information ….

Fantastic!  Michael, thank you so much for taking on loading and configuring the system and not giving the task to your tech team.  The information you gleaned from doing this yourself only enhances the content of the guide. 

I would highly recommend reading the guide if you are planning on installing and using WordPress for your blog.  Even if you decide to go with something more out of the box such as Blogger or Typepad the information in the guide on blogging and organizing your thoughts to create a worthy site are just as invaluable.

But also, among many others, thanks also to the Marketing Defined Blog, Marketing Slave and  e-Learning Centre.  Thank you, and others not specifically acknowledged, very much!

Posted by AI3's author, Mike Bergman Posted on October 22, 2005 at 3:07 pm in Blogs and Blogging, Site-related | Comments (0)
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Posted:September 28, 2005

An earlier posting described a step-by-step process for converting a Word doc to clean HTML for posting on your site. Today’s posting updates that information, with specific reference to creating multi-part HTML postings.

A multi-part posting may make sense when the original document is too long for a single posting on your site, or if you wish to serialize its presentation over postings on multiple days.

Multi-part HTML postings pose a number of unique differences from a single page posting, namely in:

  • Needing to deal with multiple internal document cross-references (not only for a table of contents but also any Word doc cross-references ((Insert –> Reference –> Cross-reference) such as for internal headers, figures, tables, etc.
  • Organizing and splitting the table of contents (TOC) itself, and
  • Image naming and referencing.

So, how does one proceed with a multi-part HTML conversion in preparation for posting?

Specific Conversion Steps

  1. The first requirement is that you must create your baseline Word document with a table of contents (TOC) (Insert –> Reference–> Index and Tables –> Table of Contents). You should give great care to the construction and organization of the TOC because it will dictate your eventual multi-part HTML pages and splits
  2. When the Word doc is absolutely complete (and only then!), follow the steps in the earlier posting on Word docs to HTML to get absolutely as clean an HTML code base as possible. Include all global search and replaces (S & R) as the earlier post instructed. UNTIL THE ABSOLUTELY LAST SPECIFIC CONVERSION STEP #6 BELOW YOU WILL CONTINUE TO WORK WITH THIS SINGLE HTML DOCUMENT! For example, you may end up with clean HTML code for your TOC such as the following:
  3. <p><a href=”#_Toc106767203″>EXECUTIVE SUMMARY. 1</a></p>

    <p><a href=”#_Toc106767204″>I. INTRODUCTION. 3</a></p>

    <p><a href=”#_Toc106767205″>Knowledge Economy. 3</a></p>

    <p><a href=”#_Toc106767206″>Corporate Intellectual Assets. 4</a></p>

    <p><a href=”#_Toc106767207″>Huge Implications. 4</a></p>

    <p><a href=”#_Toc106767208″>Data Warehousing?. 6</a></p>

    <p><a href=”#_Toc106767209″>Connecting the Dots. 6</a></p>

    <p><a href=”#_Toc106767210″>II. INTERNAL DOCUMENTS. 7</a></p>

    <p><a href=”#_Toc106767211″>&#8216;Valuable&#8217; Documents. 7</a></p>

    <p><a href=”#_Toc106767212″>&#8216;Costs&#8217; to Create. 8</a></p>

    <p><a href=”#_Toc106767213″>&#8216;Cost&#8217; to Modify. 9</a></p>

    <p><a href=”#_Toc106767214″>&#8216;Cost&#8217; of a Missed. 9</a></p>

    <p><a href=”#_Toc106767215″>Other Document &#8216;Cost&#8217;. 9</a></p>

    <p><a href=”#_Toc106767216″>Archival Lifetime. 10</a></p>

    <p><a href=”#_Toc106767217″>III. WEB DOCUMENTS AND SEARCH. 10</a></p>

    <p><a href=”#_Toc106767218″>Time and Effort for Search. 11</a></p>

    <p><a href=”#_Toc106767219″>Lost Searches. 11</a></p>

    <p><a href=”#_Toc106767220″>&#8216;Cost&#8217; of a Portal. 14</a></p>

    <p><a href=”#_Toc106767221″>&#8216;Cost&#8217; of Intranets. 16</a></p>

    <p><a href=”#_Toc106767222″>IV. OPPORTUNITIES AND THREATS. 18</a></p>

    <p><a href=”#_Toc106767223″>&#8216;Costs&#8217; of Proposals. 18</a></p>

    <p><a href=”#_Toc106767224″>&#8216;Costs&#8217; of Regulation. 21</a></p>

    <p><a href=”#_Toc106767225″>&#8216;Cost&#8217; of Misuse. 24</a></p>

    <p><a href=”#_Toc106767226″>V. CONCLUSIONS. 25</a></p>

  4. Do global S & R on the TOC references, replacing with internal page link (e.g., “./ …) references, as this example for the Intro shows:
  5. Find and Replace Screen

    There will need to be as many S & R replacements throughout the document as there are entries in the TOC. You should be careful to name your internal pages according to your anticipated final published structure for the multi-part HTML pages. Upon completion of the global S & R, you should then remove earlier Word doc page numbers and clean up spaces or other display issues. Thus, using the example above, you could end up with revised code for the TOC as follows:

    <p><a href=”./summary.html”>EXECUTIVE SUMMARY</a></p>

    <p><a href=”./intro.html”>I. INTRODUCTION</a></p>

    <p><a href=”./intro.html#knowledge”>Knowledge Economy</a></p>

    <p><a href=”./intro.html#assets”>Corporate Intellectual Assets</a></p>

    <p><a href=”./intro.html#huge”>Huge Implications</a></p>

    <p><a href=”./intro.html#data”>Data Warehousing?</a></p>

    <p><a href=”./intro.html#dots”>Connecting the Dots</a></p>

    <p><a href=”./internal.html”>II. INTERNAL DOCUMENTS</a></p>

    <p><a href=”./internal.html#docs”>&#8216;Valuable&#8217; Documents</a></p>

    <p><a href=”./internal.html#create”>&#8216;Costs&#8217; to Create</a></p>

    <p><a href=”./internal.html#modify”>&#8216;Cost&#8217; to Modify</a></p>

    <p><a href=”./internal.html#missed”>&#8216;Cost&#8217; of a Missed</a></p>

    <p><a href=”./internal.html#etc”>Other Document &#8216;Cost&#8217;</a></p>

    <p><a href=”./internal.html#archive”>Archival Lifetime</a></p>

    <p><a href=”./web.html”>III. WEB DOCUMENTS AND SEARCH</a></p>

    <p><a href=”./web.html#time”>Time and Effort for Search</a></p>

    <p><a href=”./web.html#lost”>Lost Searches</a></p>

    <p><a href=”./web.html#portal”>&#8216;Cost&#8217; of a Portal</a></p>

    <p><a href=”./web.html#intranets”>&#8216;Cost&#8217; of Intranets</a></p>

    <p><a href=”./opps.html”>IV. OPPORTUNITIES AND THREATS</a></p>

    <p><a href=”./opps.html#proposals”>&#8216;Costs&#8217; of Proposals</a></p>

    <p><a href=”./opps.html#regs”>&#8216;Costs&#8217; of Regulation</a></p>

    <p><a href=”./opps.html#misuse”>&#8216;Cost&#8217; of Misuse</a></p>

    <p><a href=”./conclusion.html”>V. CONCLUSIONS</a></p>

  6. You may also need to do additional code cleanup. For example, in the snippet below, the first href refers to the TOC entry that will be replaced via steps #3 and #6. However, the second href is an internal cross-reference from another location (not the TOC) in the Word doc. For these additional cross-references, you will need either to chose to keep them and rename logically with S & R or to remove them. (Generally, since you are already splitting a long Word doc into multiple HTML pages such additional cross-references are excessive and unnecessary; you can likely remove.):
  7. <h1><a name=”_Toc106767204″></a><a name=”_Toc90884898″> I. INTRODUCTION</a></h1>

    <p>How many documents does your organization create each year? What effort does this represent in terms of total staffing costs? Etc., etc.</p>

  8. You will then need to rename your images using global S & R, which were given sequential image numbers (not logical names) in the Word doc to HTML conversion. For example, you may have an image named:
  9. <img width=”664″ height=”402″ src=”Document_files/image001.jpg”>

    You will need to give that image a better logical name, and perhaps put it into its own image subdirectory, like the following:

    <img width=”664″ height=”402″ src=”./images/CostChart1.jpg”>

  10. Finally, your HTML is now fully prepped for splitting into multiple pages. You need to do three more things in this last step.

First, via cut-and-paste take your TOC and any intro text from the main HTML document and place it into an index.html HTML document. That should also be the parent directory for any of your subsequent split pages. Thus, in our example herein, you would have a directory structure that looks like:

MAIN (where index.html is located)

Summary

Intro

Internal

Web

Opps

Conclusion

Second, cut-and paste the HTML sections from the main HTML document that correspond to the five specific split pages (summary.html to conclusion.html) and place each of them into their own named, empty HTML shells with header information, etc. Thus, the pasted portions are what generally corresponds to the <body> . . .  </body> portion of the HTML. This is how the various subparts.html get created.

Third, and last, delete each of the main page cross-references changed during global S & R (these are all of the references without internal anchor # tags); these references are now being handled directly via the multiple, split HTML page documents. For clarity, these deleted references are thus for our example:

<p><a href=”./summary.html”>EXECUTIVE SUMMARY</a></p>

<p><a href=”./intro.html”>I. INTRODUCTION</a></p>

<p><a href=”./intro.html#knowledge”>Knowledge Economy</a></p>

<p><a href=”./intro.html#assets”>Corporate Intellectual Assets</a></p>

<p><a href=”./intro.html#huge”>Huge Implications</a></p>

<p><a href=”./intro.html#data”>Data Warehousing?</a></p>

<p><a href=”./intro.html#dots”>Connecting the Dots</a></p>

<p><a href=”./internal.html”>II. INTERNAL DOCUMENTS</a></p>

<p><a href=”./internal.html#docs”>&#8216;Valuable&#8217; Documents</a></p>

<p><a href=”./internal.html#create”>&#8216;Costs&#8217; to Create</a></p>

<p><a href=”./internal.html#modify”>&#8216;Cost&#8217; to Modify</a></p>

<p><a href=”./internal.html#missed”>&#8216;Cost&#8217; of a Missed</a></p>

<p><a href=”./internal.html#etc”>Other Document &#8216;Cost&#8217;</a></p>

<p><a href=”./internal.html#archive”>Archival Lifetime</a></p>

<p><a href=”./web.html”>III. WEB DOCUMENTS AND SEARCH</a></p>

<p><a href=”./web.html#time”>Time and Effort for Search</a></p>

<p><a href=”./web.html#lost”>Lost Searches</a></p>

<p><a href=”./web.html#portal”>&#8216;Cost&#8217; of a Portal</a></p>

<p><a href=”./web.html#intranets”>&#8216;Cost&#8217; of Intranets</a></p>

<p><a href=”./opps.html”>IV. OPPORTUNITIES AND THREATS</a></p>

<p><a href=”./opps.html#proposals”>&#8216;Costs&#8217; of Proposals</a></p>

<p><a href=”./opps.html#regs”>&#8216;Costs&#8217; of Regulation</a></p>

<p><a href=”./opps.html#misuse”>&#8216;Cost&#8217; of Misuse</a></p>

<p><a href=”./conclusion.html”>V. CONCLUSIONS</a></p>

Voilà. You now have multiple HTML pages from a Word document!