Posted:October 24, 2005

For some time now I have had a setting of ’5 days’ as the limit for the number of posts to display on my site.  My rationale, as in most things, was to limit the number of bytes any individual reader needed to wait for during  a site visit (and download).

However, that may be dial-up thinking.

I was playing around with my own site and viewed monthly archive options.  Lo and behold, with my 5-day limit, that also translated into that display as well.  So, I upped my limit to a full month (31 days) and repeated the step.

Sure, downloads were a little slower, but not truly noticeably so, and I am on an IDSL line (128 kb) anyway!  Anyone with anything approaching a modern connection should not have a problem upping post display limits.

Oh, well.  My advice to everyone (and I’m likely the last) is to up your blog display governors.

Posted by AI3's author, Mike Bergman Posted on October 24, 2005 at 4:25 pm in Blogs and Blogging, Site-related | Comments (0)
The URI link reference to this post is: http://www.mkbergman.com/149/re-visit-internal-settings-for-blog-viewing/
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Posted:October 22, 2005

I have been thankful for the many wonderful comments and reactions to my professional blogging guide.  My favorite is from Blizzard Internet Marketing:

When you come across such a generous addition to the web community you just have to share.  Last night, going through my feeds I came across the … Comprehensive Guide to a Professional Blog Site.  What a fantastic resource for the beginner professional blogger.  After spending just a few weeks with our own blog, researching and sharing online our quest to educate ourselves on the art, process, and best practices of blogging I came across this gem …. after spending just a few weeks on our own research I don't doubt how long it took to create this easy to read, easy to understand comprehensive guide.   

Michael's note taking and attention to detail as he went on his journey is impressive.  Just about every step of the way he details his tasks from choosing the program and why, to loading it on the server and configuring the system.  Within the guide are a number of resources for even more great information ….

Fantastic!  Michael, thank you so much for taking on loading and configuring the system and not giving the task to your tech team.  The information you gleaned from doing this yourself only enhances the content of the guide. 

I would highly recommend reading the guide if you are planning on installing and using WordPress for your blog.  Even if you decide to go with something more out of the box such as Blogger or Typepad the information in the guide on blogging and organizing your thoughts to create a worthy site are just as invaluable.

But also, among many others, thanks also to the Marketing Defined Blog, Marketing Slave and  e-Learning Centre.  Thank you, and others not specifically acknowledged, very much!

Posted by AI3's author, Mike Bergman Posted on October 22, 2005 at 3:07 pm in Blogs and Blogging, Site-related | Comments (0)
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Posted:September 28, 2005

An earlier posting described a step-by-step process for converting a Word doc to clean HTML for posting on your site. Today’s posting updates that information, with specific reference to creating multi-part HTML postings.

A multi-part posting may make sense when the original document is too long for a single posting on your site, or if you wish to serialize its presentation over postings on multiple days.

Multi-part HTML postings pose a number of unique differences from a single page posting, namely in:

  • Needing to deal with multiple internal document cross-references (not only for a table of contents but also any Word doc cross-references ((Insert –> Reference –> Cross-reference) such as for internal headers, figures, tables, etc.
  • Organizing and splitting the table of contents (TOC) itself, and
  • Image naming and referencing.

So, how does one proceed with a multi-part HTML conversion in preparation for posting?

Specific Conversion Steps

  1. The first requirement is that you must create your baseline Word document with a table of contents (TOC) (Insert –> Reference–> Index and Tables –> Table of Contents). You should give great care to the construction and organization of the TOC because it will dictate your eventual multi-part HTML pages and splits
  2. When the Word doc is absolutely complete (and only then!), follow the steps in the earlier posting on Word docs to HTML to get absolutely as clean an HTML code base as possible. Include all global search and replaces (S & R) as the earlier post instructed. UNTIL THE ABSOLUTELY LAST SPECIFIC CONVERSION STEP #6 BELOW YOU WILL CONTINUE TO WORK WITH THIS SINGLE HTML DOCUMENT! For example, you may end up with clean HTML code for your TOC such as the following:
  3. <p><a href=”#_Toc106767203″>EXECUTIVE SUMMARY. 1</a></p>

    <p><a href=”#_Toc106767204″>I. INTRODUCTION. 3</a></p>

    <p><a href=”#_Toc106767205″>Knowledge Economy. 3</a></p>

    <p><a href=”#_Toc106767206″>Corporate Intellectual Assets. 4</a></p>

    <p><a href=”#_Toc106767207″>Huge Implications. 4</a></p>

    <p><a href=”#_Toc106767208″>Data Warehousing?. 6</a></p>

    <p><a href=”#_Toc106767209″>Connecting the Dots. 6</a></p>

    <p><a href=”#_Toc106767210″>II. INTERNAL DOCUMENTS. 7</a></p>

    <p><a href=”#_Toc106767211″>&#8216;Valuable&#8217; Documents. 7</a></p>

    <p><a href=”#_Toc106767212″>&#8216;Costs&#8217; to Create. 8</a></p>

    <p><a href=”#_Toc106767213″>&#8216;Cost&#8217; to Modify. 9</a></p>

    <p><a href=”#_Toc106767214″>&#8216;Cost&#8217; of a Missed. 9</a></p>

    <p><a href=”#_Toc106767215″>Other Document &#8216;Cost&#8217;. 9</a></p>

    <p><a href=”#_Toc106767216″>Archival Lifetime. 10</a></p>

    <p><a href=”#_Toc106767217″>III. WEB DOCUMENTS AND SEARCH. 10</a></p>

    <p><a href=”#_Toc106767218″>Time and Effort for Search. 11</a></p>

    <p><a href=”#_Toc106767219″>Lost Searches. 11</a></p>

    <p><a href=”#_Toc106767220″>&#8216;Cost&#8217; of a Portal. 14</a></p>

    <p><a href=”#_Toc106767221″>&#8216;Cost&#8217; of Intranets. 16</a></p>

    <p><a href=”#_Toc106767222″>IV. OPPORTUNITIES AND THREATS. 18</a></p>

    <p><a href=”#_Toc106767223″>&#8216;Costs&#8217; of Proposals. 18</a></p>

    <p><a href=”#_Toc106767224″>&#8216;Costs&#8217; of Regulation. 21</a></p>

    <p><a href=”#_Toc106767225″>&#8216;Cost&#8217; of Misuse. 24</a></p>

    <p><a href=”#_Toc106767226″>V. CONCLUSIONS. 25</a></p>

  4. Do global S & R on the TOC references, replacing with internal page link (e.g., “./ …) references, as this example for the Intro shows:
  5. Find and Replace Screen

    There will need to be as many S & R replacements throughout the document as there are entries in the TOC. You should be careful to name your internal pages according to your anticipated final published structure for the multi-part HTML pages. Upon completion of the global S & R, you should then remove earlier Word doc page numbers and clean up spaces or other display issues. Thus, using the example above, you could end up with revised code for the TOC as follows:

    <p><a href=”./summary.html”>EXECUTIVE SUMMARY</a></p>

    <p><a href=”./intro.html”>I. INTRODUCTION</a></p>

    <p><a href=”./intro.html#knowledge”>Knowledge Economy</a></p>

    <p><a href=”./intro.html#assets”>Corporate Intellectual Assets</a></p>

    <p><a href=”./intro.html#huge”>Huge Implications</a></p>

    <p><a href=”./intro.html#data”>Data Warehousing?</a></p>

    <p><a href=”./intro.html#dots”>Connecting the Dots</a></p>

    <p><a href=”./internal.html”>II. INTERNAL DOCUMENTS</a></p>

    <p><a href=”./internal.html#docs”>&#8216;Valuable&#8217; Documents</a></p>

    <p><a href=”./internal.html#create”>&#8216;Costs&#8217; to Create</a></p>

    <p><a href=”./internal.html#modify”>&#8216;Cost&#8217; to Modify</a></p>

    <p><a href=”./internal.html#missed”>&#8216;Cost&#8217; of a Missed</a></p>

    <p><a href=”./internal.html#etc”>Other Document &#8216;Cost&#8217;</a></p>

    <p><a href=”./internal.html#archive”>Archival Lifetime</a></p>

    <p><a href=”./web.html”>III. WEB DOCUMENTS AND SEARCH</a></p>

    <p><a href=”./web.html#time”>Time and Effort for Search</a></p>

    <p><a href=”./web.html#lost”>Lost Searches</a></p>

    <p><a href=”./web.html#portal”>&#8216;Cost&#8217; of a Portal</a></p>

    <p><a href=”./web.html#intranets”>&#8216;Cost&#8217; of Intranets</a></p>

    <p><a href=”./opps.html”>IV. OPPORTUNITIES AND THREATS</a></p>

    <p><a href=”./opps.html#proposals”>&#8216;Costs&#8217; of Proposals</a></p>

    <p><a href=”./opps.html#regs”>&#8216;Costs&#8217; of Regulation</a></p>

    <p><a href=”./opps.html#misuse”>&#8216;Cost&#8217; of Misuse</a></p>

    <p><a href=”./conclusion.html”>V. CONCLUSIONS</a></p>

  6. You may also need to do additional code cleanup. For example, in the snippet below, the first href refers to the TOC entry that will be replaced via steps #3 and #6. However, the second href is an internal cross-reference from another location (not the TOC) in the Word doc. For these additional cross-references, you will need either to chose to keep them and rename logically with S & R or to remove them. (Generally, since you are already splitting a long Word doc into multiple HTML pages such additional cross-references are excessive and unnecessary; you can likely remove.):
  7. <h1><a name=”_Toc106767204″></a><a name=”_Toc90884898″> I. INTRODUCTION</a></h1>

    <p>How many documents does your organization create each year? What effort does this represent in terms of total staffing costs? Etc., etc.</p>

  8. You will then need to rename your images using global S & R, which were given sequential image numbers (not logical names) in the Word doc to HTML conversion. For example, you may have an image named:
  9. <img width=”664″ height=”402″ src=”Document_files/image001.jpg”>

    You will need to give that image a better logical name, and perhaps put it into its own image subdirectory, like the following:

    <img width=”664″ height=”402″ src=”./images/CostChart1.jpg”>

  10. Finally, your HTML is now fully prepped for splitting into multiple pages. You need to do three more things in this last step.

First, via cut-and-paste take your TOC and any intro text from the main HTML document and place it into an index.html HTML document. That should also be the parent directory for any of your subsequent split pages. Thus, in our example herein, you would have a directory structure that looks like:

MAIN (where index.html is located)

Summary

Intro

Internal

Web

Opps

Conclusion

Second, cut-and paste the HTML sections from the main HTML document that correspond to the five specific split pages (summary.html to conclusion.html) and place each of them into their own named, empty HTML shells with header information, etc. Thus, the pasted portions are what generally corresponds to the <body> . . .  </body> portion of the HTML. This is how the various subparts.html get created.

Third, and last, delete each of the main page cross-references changed during global S & R (these are all of the references without internal anchor # tags); these references are now being handled directly via the multiple, split HTML page documents. For clarity, these deleted references are thus for our example:

<p><a href=”./summary.html”>EXECUTIVE SUMMARY</a></p>

<p><a href=”./intro.html”>I. INTRODUCTION</a></p>

<p><a href=”./intro.html#knowledge”>Knowledge Economy</a></p>

<p><a href=”./intro.html#assets”>Corporate Intellectual Assets</a></p>

<p><a href=”./intro.html#huge”>Huge Implications</a></p>

<p><a href=”./intro.html#data”>Data Warehousing?</a></p>

<p><a href=”./intro.html#dots”>Connecting the Dots</a></p>

<p><a href=”./internal.html”>II. INTERNAL DOCUMENTS</a></p>

<p><a href=”./internal.html#docs”>&#8216;Valuable&#8217; Documents</a></p>

<p><a href=”./internal.html#create”>&#8216;Costs&#8217; to Create</a></p>

<p><a href=”./internal.html#modify”>&#8216;Cost&#8217; to Modify</a></p>

<p><a href=”./internal.html#missed”>&#8216;Cost&#8217; of a Missed</a></p>

<p><a href=”./internal.html#etc”>Other Document &#8216;Cost&#8217;</a></p>

<p><a href=”./internal.html#archive”>Archival Lifetime</a></p>

<p><a href=”./web.html”>III. WEB DOCUMENTS AND SEARCH</a></p>

<p><a href=”./web.html#time”>Time and Effort for Search</a></p>

<p><a href=”./web.html#lost”>Lost Searches</a></p>

<p><a href=”./web.html#portal”>&#8216;Cost&#8217; of a Portal</a></p>

<p><a href=”./web.html#intranets”>&#8216;Cost&#8217; of Intranets</a></p>

<p><a href=”./opps.html”>IV. OPPORTUNITIES AND THREATS</a></p>

<p><a href=”./opps.html#proposals”>&#8216;Costs&#8217; of Proposals</a></p>

<p><a href=”./opps.html#regs”>&#8216;Costs&#8217; of Regulation</a></p>

<p><a href=”./opps.html#misuse”>&#8216;Cost&#8217; of Misuse</a></p>

<p><a href=”./conclusion.html”>V. CONCLUSIONS</a></p>

Voilà. You now have multiple HTML pages from a Word document!

Posted:August 15, 2005

As my efforts proceeded in getting this blog set up, I began to realize I was devoting substantially more time and effort to the activity than I originally anticipated. It was roughly at this time of realization that I began tracking time and effort. To date, I have spent about 300 hours(!!) getting my site ready to go, but I know this is in no way typical.

In fact, with services like Blogger, you can be up and running in 5 minutes and for free and posting comments immediately. For reasons noted in my ‘Prepare to Blog’ diary, this de minimus effort may not be advisable. On the other hand, my own needs and demands should not be indicative either. In any event, I present below the breakdown of my time and effort tracking and discuss what may be more "typical" expectations.

Unusual Demands for AI3

As I’ve stated elsewhere, there are some unique and unusual circumstances I have placed on my set-up and investigations leading to AI3. I have wanted, for example, to:

  • Understand the blogging and self-publishing phenomenon
  • Get my hands dirty with respect to existing tools and infrastructure
  • Actually put in place a procedure that will allow me to continue to contribute in an efficient way
  • Be aggressive about capabilities and understand "gaps" for bloggers (esp. the "top 1%" in moving forward
  • Learn and test tools and techniques to discover gaps and friction points suitable for commercial attention
  • Push the edge of the envelop on performance, scale and functionality so as to approach industrial-strength blog sites, perhaps suitable for enterprise use; and
  • In general, thoroughly immerse myself into this new culture and technology.

I think I’ve been successful in these aims, but as noted before, incurred time and effort is not typical. As I present the numbers below, I will try to be specific about what may be applicable. Please understand the reference and viewpoint I present is for a serious blog content site, perhaps only applicable to 10% of bloggers or so.

Time and Effort Breakdowns

The table below presents the results of my time and effort tracking. The table shows that about XXX hours have been spent getting AI3 ready over a time from decision to do it until commercial release of about three months. These times and efforts are well removed from a 5-min Blogger site!



Hours by Major Area

Blog Link
Date
Research
Set-up
Add Tools
Techniques
Composition
Posting
Total
First Post – Decided to Blog 4/27/05 1.0 0.2
0.1
1.3
First Blog Test Drive 4/28/05 1.0 0.5 0.2
0.1
1.8
WordPress 4/29/05 4.0 2.0 0.6
0.3
6.9
Local Hosting
5/2/05
5.0



1.0
0.5
6.5
Install Difficulties and Then Success!
5/5/05
2.0
14.0


1.2
0.6
17.8
Design and Hacking CSS 5/6/05 5.0 2.0 0.2
0.1
7.3
No Local Images
5/7/05
3.0
0.5

2.0
0.4
0.2
6.1
Posts/Comments Behavior 5/8/05 1.0 1.5 0.1

2.6
Advanced Functionality
5/9/05
5.0



0.2
0.1
5.3
Site Transfer
5/17/05

6.0

1.0
0.1

7.1
Begin Content 5/18/05 0.5
0.1
0.6
Release Checklist 5/20/05 2.0 2.0 4.0
2.0
10.0
Editor Comparisons
5/20/05
6.0
2.0

1.0
6.0
3.0
18.0
Xinha Integration 5/31/05 1.0 1.0 6.0 1.0 0.4
0.2
9.6
External Credits and Thanks 6/13/05 3.0 1.0 0.8
0.4
5.2
Permalink Problems
6/15/05
3.0
0.8

3.0
1.6
0.8
9.2
Standard Site Content 6/15/05 1.0 3.0 16.0 8.0 28.0
Word Docs to HTML
6/16/05
4.0
2.0
3.0
6.0
8.0
4.0
27.0
Site Project Management 6/17/05 1.0 1.5 3.0
0.3
5.8
Not Playing Nice in the Sandbox 6/19/05 2.0 6.0 2.0
1.0
11.0
Use of Styles and Style Sheets 6/20/05 3.0 6.0 4.0
1.5
14.5
Clean Up Posts [not posted]
6/22/05




2.0
8.0
10.0
Some Best Practices 6/22/05 1.0

4.0 6.0
3.0
14.0
Large Document Transfer 6/24/05 1.0 1.0 2.0 1.0
8.0
13.0
Cross-browser Compatibility 6/24/05 2.0 3.0 4.0
2.0
11.0
File Organization and Naming 6/25/05 1.0 1.0
0.5
2.5
The Purposeful Blogger 6/25/05 2.0
1.0
3.0
Time Estimates
6/26/05
2.5



0.8
0.4
3.7
Word Docs to HTML II
6/26/05
1.0


2.0
3.0
1.0
7.0
W3C XHTML Validation
6/26/05
4.0
0.1

3.0
1.5
0.5
9.1
Screen Resolution Fix 7/5/05 4.0 0.1 1.5 1.5
0.5
7.6
Trackback and Ping Setup/Testing 7/12/05 3.0 1.5 1.0
0.3
5.8
Better Quicktags for Comments 7/14/05 3.0 1.0 1.0 0.5 2.0
0.5
8.0
Formal Site Release! 7/18/05 3.0 1.0
4.0
0.0
Prepare to Blog Summary and PDF
7/20/05
1.5


0.5
6.0
2.0
10.0
Summary – ‘Typical’ Tasks
Total 37.0 10.6 8.5 33.0 16.0 8.0 113.1
% of Total 32.7% 9.4% 7.5% 29.2% 14.1% 7.1%
Summary – All AI3 Tasks (incl. red)
Total 74.0 36.0 11.5 51.5 85.3 52.0 310.3
% of Total 23.9% 11.6% 3.7% 16.6% 27.5% 16.7%
Summary – Non-’Typical’ AI3 Tasks








Total

37.0
25.4
3.0
18.5
69.3
44.0
197.2
% of Total

18.8%
12.9%
1.5%
9.4%
35.2%
22.3%

The table lists about 30 subtasks (generally documented as individual posts on AI3) broken into the six major activity areas of Research, Set-up, Adding (or integrating) Tools, Composing Posts, or Posting clean posts with review and formatting. Please note the red entries, since these are deemed to be specific to my unusual demands for AI3 and are therefore not typical of what a serious blogger without these aims might experience. The unusual entries are either entire tasks associated with investigating tools and techniques or the efforts spent in composing and posting the ‘Preparing to Blog’ diary.

Observations and Guidance for the Serious Blogger

A serious blogger should be able to get a fairly comprehensive and well-designed site up and running in less than 100 hours, less if some of the lessons and guidance from the ‘Preparing to Blog’ diary are followed, and further less if standard site content (mission, about me, etc.) is shorter than what I provided on the AI3 site. Moreover, unlike the three months it took to get AI3 released, much quicker turnarounds could be easily accomplished. The longer times for AI3 were exacerbated by the three-times effort associated with the site’s unusual demands, business travel and demands, and one family vacation!

Some other observations that may guide planning for serious blogging from these numbers are (with the obvious caveats that different styles and skills may significantly alter these points):

  • As a rule of thumb, consider that research and reading in advance of a given post takes about two times longer than actually writing up the results
  • Besides normal composition time, consider adding another 50% of time to make sure the formatting is correct and the posting will display properly. In other words, preparing a "content-rich" document for your blog may require 150% of the time it formerly took you
  • Set-up time, checklists, site management techniques, naming and filing conventions, etc., are well worth getting worked out in advance to reduce ongoing maintenance and relieve you to post and respond, and
  • Continue to record and maintain best practices as you encounter them.

Finally, ongoing requirements and care-and-feeding will remain demands. If one assumes roughly three "good" posts per week to keep a blog active, the numbers above suggest a weekly effort of about 20-25 hours per week or about 1-2 hrs per day, exclusive of responding to user comments. This may suggest lowering expectations to only a couple of quality postings per week.

 

Author’s Note:  I actually decided to commit to a blog on April 27, 2005, and began recording soon thereafter my steps in doing so.  Because of work demands and other delays, the actual site was not released until July 18, 2005.  To give my ‘Prepare to Blog …’ postings a more contemporaneous feel, I arbitrarily changed posting dates on this series one month forward, which means some aspects of the actual blog were better developed than some of these earlier posts indicate.  However, the sequence and the content remain unchanged.  A re-factored complete guide will be posted at the conclusion of the ‘Prepare to Blog …’ series, targeted for release about August 18, 2005.  mkb

Posted by AI3's author, Mike Bergman Posted on August 15, 2005 at 1:24 pm in Blogs and Blogging, Site-related | Comments (2)
The URI link reference to this post is: http://www.mkbergman.com/94/preparing-to-blog-time-and-effort-estimates/
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Posted:August 14, 2005

Author’s Note: There is zipped Javascript code that supports the information in this post. If you develop improvements, please email Mike and let him know of your efforts.


Download JS quicktags code file Click here to download the zipped Javascript code file and LGPL license (14 KB)

Most blogs provide some text explanation above the comment field for what HTML tags the commenter may provide in her response.  However, I’d seen some other sites that had some buttons that automated some of this process. I set out to add this capability to my site with two objectives in mind:  1) make it easy for the non-HTML user to format a post comment; and 2) keep options narrowed to what I thought was an appropriate subset of HTML format tags.

The WordPress Quicktags Facility

The internal WordPress post and page editor comes with what it calls “quicktags.”  These tags, and their explanations, are:

str
“Strong” – creates a <strong> tag that gives strong emphasis (read – bold) to your text
em
“Emphasis” – creates a <em> tag that gives emphasis (read – italics) to your text
link
Link – creates a hyperlink to a web address which you supply in the pop-up box that is activated by the quicktag. If you select text before you click on the link tag, that text will be used as the link text (the clickable stuff) that will be displayed in your post
b-quote
Blockquote – creates a set of blockquote tags that indent text on both the left and right margins. An example follows

This text is within a blockquote tag

del
Delete – deleted text, text that has a strikethrough line through it
ins
Insert – inserted text, text that has been inserted; marked with an underline
img
Image – this works in much the same way as the link tag, you enter the URL of an image into a pop-up box and the image will be inserted into your post
ul
Unordered List – this adds the opening tag to create an unordered list (bulleted) in your post
ol
Ordered List – this adds the opening tag to create an ordered list (numbered) in your post
li
List Item – this adds a single list item to either the unordered or ordered lists. This tag requires either the ordered or unordered list tags to precede it.
code
Code – text that is formatted in a monospaced font to differentiate between code clips and regular text
more
More – this tag adds a <!–more–> tag to your post, which puts in a “more . . . ” link and puts the rest of your post on another page
page
Page – this tag adds a <!–nextpage–> tag to your post, which continues your post on a second page
Dict.
Dictionary lookup – looks up the word you enter into the pop-up box at dictionary.com and opens the definition page in a new window of your browser
Close Tags
Close Tags – this closes any tags (str, em, link, b-quote, del, ins, ul, ol, li, code) that must be closed in order to stop the formatting from continuing down the page. Each tag also turns into a close tag sign (ul becomes /ul, etc.) to allow you to close that individual tag as well.

Alex King’s Expanded Javascript Quicktags

As an addition to either the existing administrator quicktags or for addition in formatting online comments, Alex King expanded this listiing and provided it in a LGPL-based Javascript download.  This Javascript Quicktags is up to version 1.2 and is the basis for what I incorporated on my site for formatting online comments.

My Modifications

While I liked this version, it had some limitations in meeting my objectives:

  1. Too many buttons were provided; I wanted a simpler subset of format tools
  2. None of the buttons had tooltips, so that it was hard to understand what some of them did
  3. Some of the labels needed clarification
  4. I wanted a ‘Preview’ option that would show respondents what their final comments would look like once posted.

The result was that I modified Alex’s starting code.  If you would like to install the same version I have on this site — see the comment field with its buttons below — download the file noted at the top of this post. It includes all of the license and installation instructions of Alex’s current 1.2 version with my modifications.

Future Efforts

I will work to add a preview capability so that the commenter can see her formatted comments before submitting the post.  Longer term, I want to install a limited format WYSIWYG editor, similar to what I am using internally with Xinha.

Author’s Note: I actually decided to commit to a blog on April 27, 2005, and began recording soon thereafter my steps in doing so.  Because of work demands and other delays, the actual site was not released until July 18, 2005.  To give my ‘Prepare to Blog …’ postings a more contemporaneous feel, I arbitrarily changed posting dates on this series one month forward, which means some aspects of the actual blog were better developed than some of these earlier posts indicate.  However, the sequence and the content remain unchanged.  A re-factored complete guide will be posted at the conclusion of the ‘Prepare to Blog …’ series, targeted for release about August 18, 2005.  mkb

Posted by AI3's author, Mike Bergman Posted on August 14, 2005 at 10:55 am in Blogs and Blogging, Site-related | Comments (0)
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