Posted:January 25, 2010

Sweet Tools Listing

Minor Updates Provided to these Standard AI3 Datasets

If you are like me, you like to clear the decks before the start of major new projects. In Structured Dynamics‘ case, we actually have multiple new initiatives getting underway, so the deck clearing has been especially focused this time.

As a result, we have updated Sweet Tools, AI3‘s listing of semantic Web and -related tools, with the addition of some 30 new tools, updates to others, and deletions of five expired entries. The dataset now lists 835 tools. And, as before, there is also now a new structured data view via conStruct (pick the Sweet Tools dataset).

We have also updated SWEETpedia, a listing of 246 research articles that use Wikipedia in one way or another to do semantic-Web related research. Some 20 new papers were added to this update.

Please use the comments section on this post to suggest new tools or new research articles for inclusion in future updates.

Posted:January 6, 2010

SD Selected to Proceed with Formal Proposal

Citizen DAN LogoStructured Dynamics and its Citizen DAN project has been selected as one of the finalists to proceed with a formal proposal for the 2010 $5 million Knight News Challenge. The proposal extends SD’s basic structWSF and conStruct Drupal frameworks to provide a data appliance and network (DAN) to support citizen journalists with data and analysis at the local, community level.

Thanks to all of you who submitted votes in support of the earlier draft proposal. The News Challenge received 2,489 proposals for the 2010 contest, according to Jose Zamora, journalism program associate at the Knight Foundation. According to the Nieman Journalism Lab, Zamora said 65 percent of proposals came through the closed category and 35 percent were open.

The next-round full proposals are due by January 31. Eventual winners are slated to be announced around mid-June 2010.

Posted:December 18, 2009

Sweet Tools Listing

Sweet Tools Expands by 13% to 810 Tools; Gets Major Structured Data Update

Sweet Tools, AI3‘s listing of semantic Web and -related tools, now has a total of 810 tools listed, a significant expansion from the last update. With the retirement of 19 prior tools, this new listing represents an increase of 93 tools, or 13%, from the previous version that listed 736.

The Sweet Tools dataset is also now showing the way to a couple of exciting innovations:  new generic ontology-driven applications for structured data; and, tools for authoring structured data via spreadsheets.

Summary of Major Changes

So, here is the summary of major changes in this new listing:

  • Sweet Tools conStruct Structured ViewA completely new structured data view of the listing, courtesy of Structured DynamicsstructWSF and conStruct open source frameworks. This version can be viewed on the conStruct SCS Web site (pick the Sweet Tools dataset). You can compare this server-side presentation and version to the client-side JavaScript version using Exhibit that has been part of this blog for some time
  • A new structural organization of the tools into an ontology that relates portions of the ACM classification and  UMBEL to the tools categories. This provides richer retrievals and inspections on the conStruct version (the Exhibit version remains fairly “flat” in structure)
  • In light of the above, refined tools classifications, and, of course,
  • The increase in coverage to 810 tools.

To see the major Sweet Tools page for this updated listing in its existing format, filter on ‘New’ under New or Existing? to see the recent additions. Alternatively, you can also see this same filtering using the conStruct structured data view by searching on the Status attribute using the value ‘New’; see example here.

See the new Sweet Tools structured data display at conStruct!

Structured Data via conStruct

Though still formative, the most exciting change with the Sweet Tools listing is this new presentation via conStruct. It is a structured data Web services framework with a UI, all offered as a set of modules to Drupal. To kick the tires with this new system, you may want to look at:

BTW, there are some helpful documentation pages that show how all of these various tools work and more, such as, for example, Browse. (Also, BTW, as a demo user, you also are not seeing all of the write and update tools, either; again, see the documentation.)

The essential underlying basis to conStruct is the structWSF Web services framework. There are still some aspects to this system that we feel are incomplete and we are working on.  Some of these things include dropdown selections (controlled vocabulary selects); easier template creation; and intuitive template re-use. Nonetheless, these additions will come quickly, and what is here is already a great demonstration of how structured data can drive generic tools and interfaces.

The case study of how this system was constructed from a spreadsheet input using the irON vocabulary is described in an earlier post.

Updated Statistics

The updated Sweet Tools listing now includes nearly 50 different tools categories. The most prevalent categories are browser tools (RDF, OWL), information extraction, parsers or converters, composite application frameworks and general ontology tools. Each accounts for more than 8% — or more than 50 tools — of the total. This breakdown is as follows (click to expand):

Sweet Tools ApplicationsThere are no real discernable trends in application tool categories over the past couple of years.

As for the languages these applications are written in, that has stayed pretty steady, too. Java is still the leading language at about 46%, which has been very slightly trending downward over the past three years or so. PHP has increased a bit as well. The current splits are (click to expand):

Prior Updates

Background on prior listings and earlier statistics may be found on these previous posts:

With interim updates periodically over that period.

Posted by AI3's author, Mike Bergman Posted on December 18, 2009 at 9:50 am in Open Source, Semantic Web Tools, Structured Web | Comments (3)
The URI link reference to this post is: http://www.mkbergman.com/850/semantic-web-tools-listing-now-exceeds-800-entries/
The URI to trackback this post is: http://www.mkbergman.com/850/semantic-web-tools-listing-now-exceeds-800-entries/trackback/
Posted:December 14, 2009

We Invite You to Comment on this Knight News Challenge Submission

Citizen DAN LogoStructured Dynamics is one of the 320+ plus submitters (and counting!) to the 2010 $5 million Knight News Challenge. Our proposal is to extend our basic structWSF and conStruct Drupal frameworks to provide a data appliance and network (DAN) to support citizen journalists with data and analysis at the local, community level.

We invite you to look at our application and to provide comments or your rating of the application. The deadline for comments is tomorrow, and we will incorporate any appropriate last-minute suggestions. You can find our submission at:

Citizen DAN Proposal (or, search on ‘citizen dan’)

Please note: you must be signed in via a short submission to vote or comment on the application (or others shown in the listings).

The Citizen DAN Idea

Citizen DAN is meant to be a complete, open source framework for promoting citizen journalism. It is a:

  • Appliance for filtering and analyzing data specific to local community indicators
  • Meeting place for the public to upload and share local data and information
  • Web data portal that can be individually tailored by any local community, and
  • Node in a global network of communities across which to compare measures of community well-being.

Good decisions and good journalism require good starting information. Citizen DAN is a framework to provide access for any citizen to learn and compare local statistics and data with other similar communities. This helps to promote the grist for citizen journalism, as well as to provide a vehicle for discovery and learning across the community.

Citizen DAN will come pre-packaged with all necessary deployment components and documentation, including local data from government sources. It will include facilities for direct upload of additional local data in formats from spreadsheets to standard databases; many standard converters are included with the basic package.

Citizen DAN may be implemented either by local governments or by community advocacy groups. When deployed, using its clear documentation, sponsors may choose whether or what portions of local data are exposed to the broader Citizen DAN network. Data exposed on the network is automatically available to any other network community for comparison and analysis purposes.

(You may want to see our separate description — structWSF: A Framework for Collaboration Networks — of how this framework can lead to collaboration through widely distributed community nodes.)

The complete data appliance and network (DAN) is multi-lingual. If funded, this project will be tested and deployed in at least two prominent cities; one in Canada (French and English), and one in the United States (English and Spanish).

We think Citizen DAN is an exciting new prospect for local communities to share and use local data. Your support can help make this app available to any community for free.

And, in any case, do check out the other fine submissions to the challenge.

Posted:November 10, 2009

Sweet Tools breaks sound barrier

New Release Expands to 810 Tools; Gets Major Structured Data Update

It has been eight months since the last major update to Sweet Tools, AI3‘s listing of semantic Web and -related tools. With today’s release, there are now a total of 810 tools listed, crashing through the sound barrier of 761 tools. With the retirement of 19 prior tools, this new listing represents an increase of 93 tools, or 13%, from the previous version that listed 736.

But simply adding to the tools listing is not the cause of this longer than normal period between updates.

This little Sweet Tools dataset is now showing the way to a couple of exciting innovations:  new generic ontology-driven applications for structured data; and, tools for authoring structured data via spreadsheets.

We deal with the former in this post. I will deal with the spreadsheet business in a subsequent post.

Summary of Major Changes

So, here is the summary of major changes in this new listing:

  • Sweet Tools conStruct Structured ViewA completely new structured data view of the listing, courtesy of Structured DynamicsstructWSF and conStruct open source frameworks. This version can be viewed on the conStruct SCS Web site (pick the Sweet Tools dataset). You can compare this server-side presentation and version to the client-side JavaScript version using Exhibit that has been part of this blog for some time
  • A new structural organization of the tools into an ontology that relates portions of the ACM classification and  UMBEL to the tools categories. This provides richer retrievals and inspections on the conStruct version (the Exhibit version remains fairly “flat” in structure)
  • In light of the above, refined tools classifications, and, of course,
  • The increase in coverage to 810 tools.

To see the major Sweet Tools page for this updated listing in its existing format, filter on ‘New’ under New or Existing? to see the recent additions. Alternatively, you can also see this same filtering using the conStruct structured data view by searching on the Status attribute using the value ‘New’; see example here.

See the new Sweet Tools structured data display at conStruct!

Structured Data via conStruct

Though still formative, the most exciting change with the Sweet Tools listing is this new presentation via conStruct. It is a structured data Web services framework with a UI, all offered as a set of modules to Drupal. To kick the tires with this new system, you may want to look at:

BTW, there are some helpful documentation pages that show how all of these various tools work and more, such as, for example, Browse. (Also, BTW, as a demo user, you also are not seeing all of the write and update tools, either; again, see the documentation.)

The essential underlying basis to conStruct is the structWSF Web services framework. There are still some aspects to this system that we feel are incomplete and we are working on.  Some of these things include dropdown selections (controlled vocabulary selects); easier template creation; and intuitive template re-use. Nonetheless, these additions will come quickly, and what is here is already a great demonstration of how structured data can drive generic tools and interfaces.

As I said:  More on this in a later post.

Updated Statistics

The updated Sweet Tools listing now includes nearly 50 different tools categories. The most prevalent categories are browser tools (RDF, OWL), information extraction, parsers or converters, composite application frameworks and general ontology tools. Each accounts for more than 8% — or more than 50 tools — of the total. This breakdown is as follows (click to expand):

Sweet Tools ApplicationsThere are no real discernable trends in application tool categories over the past couple of years.

As for the languages these applications are written in, that has stayed pretty steady, too. Java is still the leading language at about 46%, which has been very slightly trending downward over the past three years or so. PHP has increased a bit as well. The current splits are (click to expand):

Prior Updates

Background on prior listings and earlier statistics may be found on these previous posts:

With interim updates periodically over that period.

Note: Because of comments expirations on prior posts, this entry is now the new location for adding a suggested new tool. Simply provide your information in the comments section, and your tool will be included in the next update.

Posted by AI3's author, Mike Bergman Posted on November 10, 2009 at 5:35 pm in Open Source, Semantic Web Tools, Structured Web | Comments (3)
The URI link reference to this post is: http://www.mkbergman.com/844/sweet-tools-shatters-the-sound-barrier/
The URI to trackback this post is: http://www.mkbergman.com/844/sweet-tools-shatters-the-sound-barrier/trackback/