Posted:June 17, 2005

Preparing to Blog – Site Transfer

Kevin Klawonn, BrightPlanet’s sys admin, got the basic blog package I had set up on my local machine transferred and installed on commercial servers. His report on this transfer follows:

Like most sysadmins out there, my plate is always full. So when I was asked to install WordPress I was hoping that it would be a simple installation taking less than 30 minutes to review the installation procedure, install the software, and then make the necessary configuration changes. Upon visiting the WordPress website, I saw the "5 Minute Installation" page and started laughing because my karma isn’t good enough that I should actually be able to have WordPress installed in 5 minutes.

I perused the requirements:

  • PHP v4.1 or greater. I had installed PHP before and this is a simple install
  • MySQL v3.23.23 or greater. I have MySQL installed on another server so this requirement was already met
  • Apache module mod_rewrite support. This was going to be the most difficult part of the installation.

The server identified to host WordPress already has IIS running on it and therefore did not have mod_rewrite support built in. Instead of finding a 3rd party option for this requirement, I decided to install Apache 2.0 on the same server. To accomplish this, I needed to force IIS to bind only to the IP Addresses which it actually uses. By default IIS binds to all IP Addresses of the server whether they are used or not. A Microsoft support topicI had used before explains how to accomplish this task; in my previous experience I had no side effects so I felt comfortable doing the same thing in this situation. http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=http://support.microsoft.com:80/support/kb/articles/Q238/1/31.ASP&NoWebContent=1

Once done configuring IIS, I added another IP address to the server, opened port 80 in the firewall to the new IP Address and installed Apache 2.0 configuring it to use the new IP Address. I then installed PHP, and configured Apache to use PHP.

The final step before installing WordPress was to setup a database on MySQL. Although MySQL resided on a different server, this did not matter to the configuration of WordPress. I created a new database and user for WordPress to use.

Finally, I was ready to install the actual WordPress software. I uploaded the zip file to the webserver and unzipped it. I edited the wp-config-sample.php file per the "5 Minute Installation" instructions. Once the database information was configured, I opened my web browser and ran the http://{website}/wp-admin/install.php script. And in just that quick the blog website was setup.

Great work, Kevin, and other than some minor file references, I am now in a position to begin transfering what I had been prototyping locally.

 

Author’s Note:  I actually decided to commit to a blog on April 27, 2005, and began recording soon thereafter my steps in doing so.  Because of work demands and other delays, the actual site was not released until July 18, 2005.  To give my ‘Prepare to Blog …’ postings a more contemporaneous feel, I arbitrarily changed posting dates on this series one month forward, which means some aspects of the actual blog were better developed than some of these earlier posts indicate.  However, the sequence and the content remain unchanged.  A re-factored complete guide will be posted at the conclusion of the ‘Prepare to Blog …’ series, targeted for release about August 18, 2005.  mkb

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Preparing to Blog – Site Transfer

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Kevin Klawonn, BrightPlanet’s sys admin, got the basic blog package I had set up on my local machine transferred and installed on commercial servers. His report on this transfer follows: Like most sysadmins out there, my plate is always full. So when I was asked to install WordPress I was hoping that it would be […]

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