Posted:October 28, 2008

WOA! So RESTful it is UMBELievable!

It's UMBELievable!

UMBEL’s New Web Services Embrace a Full Web-Oriented Architecture

I recently wrote about WOA (Web-oriented architecture), a term coined by Nick Gall, and how it represented a natural marriage between RESTful Web services and RESTful linked data. There was, of course, a method behind that posting to foreshadow some pending announcements from UMBEL and Zitgist.

Well, those announcements are now at hand, and it is time to disclose some of the method behind our madness.

As Fred Giasson notes in his announcement posting, UMBEL has just released some new Web services with fully RESTful endpoints. We have been working on the design and architecture behind this for some time and, all I can say is, it’s UMBELievable!

As Fred notes, there is further background information on the UMBEL project — which is a lightweight reference structure based on about 20,000 subject concepts and their relationships for placing Web content and data in context with other data — and the API philosophy underlying these new Web services. For that background, please check out those references; that is not my main point here.

A RESTful Marriage

We discussed much in coming up with the new design for these UMBEL Web services. Most prominent was taking seriously a RESTful design and grounding all of our decisions in the HTTP 1.1 protocol. Given the shared approaches between RESTful services and linked data, this correspondence felt natural.

What was perhaps most surprising, though, was how complete and well suited HTTP was as a design and architectural basis for these services. Sure, we understood the distinctions of GET and POST and persistent URIs and the need to maintain stateless sessions with idempotent design, but what we did not fully appreciate was how content and serialization negotiation and error and status messages also were natural results of paying close attention to HTTP. For example, here is what the UMBEL Web services design now embraces:

  • An idempotent design that maintains state and independence of operation
  • Language, character set, encoding, serialization and mime type enforced by header information and conformant with content negotiation
  • Error messages and status codes inherited from HTTP
  • Common and consistent terminology to aid understanding of the universal interface
  • A resulting componentization and design philosophy that is inherently scalable and interoperable
  • A seamless consistency between data and services.

There are likely other services out there that embrace this full extent of RESTful design (though we are not aware of them). What we are finding most exciting, though, is the ease with which we can extend our design into new services and to mesh up data with other existing ones. This idea of scalability and distributed interoperability is truly, truly powerful.

It is almost like, sure, we knew the words and the principles behind REST and a Web-oriented architecture, but had really not fully taken them to heart. As our mindset now embraces these ideas, we feel like we have now looked clearly into the crystal ball of data and applications. We very much like what we see. WOA is most cool.

First Layer to the Zitgist ‘Grand Vision’

For lack of a better phrase, Zitgist has a component internal plan that it calls its ‘Grand Vision’ for moving forward. Though something of a living document, this reference describes how Zitgist is going about its business and development. It does not describe our markets or products (of course, other internal documents do that), but our internal development approaches and architectural principles.

Just as we have seen a natural marriage between RESTful Web services and RESTful linked data, there are other natural fits and synergies. Some involve component design and architecting for pipeline models. Some involve the natural fit of domain-specific languages (DSLs) to common terminology and design, too. Still others involve use of such constructs in both GUIs and command-line interfaces (CLIs), again all built from common language and terminology that non-programmers and subject matter experts alike can readily embrace. Finally, some is a preference for Python to wrap legacy apps and to provide a productive scripting environment for DSLs.

If one can step back a bit and realize there are some common threads to the principles behind RESTful Web services and linked data, that very same mindset can be applied to many other architectural and design issues. For us, at Zitgist, these realizations have been like turning on a very bright light. We can see clearly now, and it is pretty UMBELievable. These are indeed exciting times.

BTW, I would like to thank Eric Hoffer for the very clever play on words with the UMBELievable tag line. Thanks, Eric, you rock!

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WOA! So RESTful it is UMBELievable!

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UMBEL’s New Web Services Embrace a Full Web-Oriented Architecture I recently wrote about WOA (Web-oriented architecture), a term coined by Nick Gall, and how it represented a natural marriage between RESTful Web services and RESTful linked data. There was, of course, a method behind that posting to foreshadow some pending announcements from UMBEL and Zitgist. […]

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