Posted:May 15, 2006

Rainy Day Stuff: Semantic Web Videos

There is often no substitute for learning about subjects than from the key practitioners and thinkers behind them. Even though one noted researcher in this field, Hamish Cunningham at the University of Sheffield, a specialist in human language technology (HLT), does sometimes cite the low 5% retention of information from a lecture, I am finding repeated viewings and rewinds to be a pretty effective way to learn:

http://pegasus.cc.ucf.edu/~tbayston/eme6313/learning_pyramid.jpg

[The original Learning Pyramid analysis traces back to the 1960s and is now attributed to the NTL Institute; the actual picture is from Dr. Tom Bayston at the University of Central Florida. It would be interesting to know whether repeated viewings of online videos, or simultaneous video + Powerpoints act to increase retention. (Actually, blogging about something may be at the higher end of retention within the Learning Pyramid.) I'm also finding that the combination of video/slides with the audio explanations to be immensely helpful.]

Nonetheless, I have previously reported on some great online Semantic Web videos, for example, one by Henry Story and another by Tim Berners-Lee, and faced with a rainy day I tried to be more comprehensive in my discovery.

I found many distribution points, but was most taken with a series of video tutorials and training sessions from SEKT (Semantically-enabled Knowledge Technologies), a three-year, EU-sponsored project that ends at the end of 2006.

SEKT – Online video presentations. SEKT offers 19 different ones; some with syncrhonized slides or alternatively slides (PPTs) separately. My three favorites (block out four hours!!!) are:

Besdies these, here are some other good intro to advanced videos that you can watch off the Web:

So, wait for that rainy day, grab some hot chocolate, and enjoy!

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Rainy Day Stuff: Semantic Web Videos

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There is often no substitute for learning about subjects than from the key practitioners and thinkers behind them. Even though one noted researcher in this field, Hamish Cunningham at the University of Sheffield, a specialist in human language technology (HLT), does sometimes cite the low 5% retention of information from a lecture, I am finding […]

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